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Upcycling Dead Vines into a Natural Tray

Lots of people love the Blue Pea flower and grow the plant on their corridors, in community gardens and home gardens. Once the plant dies, its vines are off to the compost heap or trash bin, which is such a waste. It can be turned into a tray, basket, screening, and a barrier for the garden. Grape vines, grasses, fruit tree stems, and banana leaves can also be used. My Blue Pea plant was lush and grew against my (hideous) chain-linked fence for some months, I was quite sad when it died but I also knew that I could give it a second life as a tray for garden harvests. I was inspired by this video on Gardening Australia. Subsequently, I had a look on YouTube...

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The charm of Pulau Ubin

A familiar haunt for Singaporeans, Pulau Ubin is a green idyllic space a hop and a skip from the mainland. I was there a few weeks ago with my artist/curator friend, Jacquelyn Soo, to view its vegetable, herb and spice garden and other nature spaces as inspiration for our upcoming joint exhibition project for Sum > Parts: When Artists Meet the Public. There's a carefree vibe on the island, and the sensible pace of life there made time seem slower, giving us time to appreciate each moment we had. There are more bicycles than cars and people, and the dogs here are so friendly and seem so happy, they look like they are smiling. There's greenery everywhere, and even on the roof of...

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Building a herbal garden

The plan is to have a garden apothecary and to go outside and get medicated naturally, rather than buying pharmaceutical products in a box. Since medication is mostly derived from plants, we might as well go straight to the source!

When I had first watched an episode of River Cottage where Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall visits a herbalist of sorts, and she draws a bath for him using flowers and herbs from her garden, I was smitten with the idea of one day having a romantic looking garden full of magical plants and know-how. It wasn’t until I’d watched Grow Your Own Drugs by James Wong, that I had grown to realise how within reach that dream was; as long as I did proper research and tried not to be too ambitious immediately, that I would get there. It wasn’t as painful and clinical as I had always thought it to be; it’s kind of like cooking, isn’t it?

But where does one start?

Five organic veggie delivery services in Singapore

I love my veggies fresh, organic, local, and from my backyard if available. Also, I'm not fond of packaging. But not much is growing in my Singapore garden, so it makes perfect sense for me to get a box of veggies delivered instead. When making a choice of who to order from, I went with Green Circle Eco Farm because I had visited their premises some months back and wanted to support Evelyn, whose gentle spirit I love. I also like their farming philosophy of not using greenhouses to keep it as close as possible to how nature intended it. Not that I have anything against greenhouses. If you are looking to get a box of organic veggies delivered, you might want to try one of...

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This is Moondance!

They call it God's country out here in the Rainbow Region, and Moondance is the name of the property I go to rest my spirit with my boyfriend when I'm in Australia to visit him. Spanning six acres, Moondance has plants and fruit trees from South America and Asia, lovingly put in the garden from scratch by its previous owners. Dan and his family have since added to the property by putting in a food garden, and necessary features like a water tank and solar water heating. It is situated in a rainforest in the hinterland of Byron Bay, and it can quickly get pretty wild and overgrown if not maintained. Dan and I take care of the veggie patch and plant...

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